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How to create slides and company cards that prompt action

When you share slides or hand someone a company card, you’re welcoming people to act. A connect to your slides on a slide encourages people to take a look at your discussion later on. An e-mail address on your business card asks the recipient to send you email.

Title slides often suggest too couple of actions and business cards offer too numerous. To see what I suggest, open a couple of public presentations and set out a few business cards. Let’s look initially at the details to eliminate, then at information you must include.

Info to remove

1. Eliminate fax number

Unless you send out or get faxes as a core part of your workflow, omit this number from your business cards. (And if you still send out and receive faxes as a core part of your workflow, add “upgrade workflow” to your job list.).

2. Eliminate street address.

Make sure that a look for your company returns up-to-date addresses info. If not, update your address info with Google, on Facebook, and on your website.

If the purpose of your card or slides is to motivate individuals to go to one specific location, promote your address. Otherwise, omit it.

3. Eliminate contact number(s).

Unless you actually want people to call, you can probably omit your telephone number from your slides and business card. This is particularly true if you wish to get in touch with people born between 1981 and 1999: A call is their least preferred method to communicate, according to information Mary Meeker provided in her Internet Trends 2016 report.

At least, omit multiple numbers from your cards and slides. Cards that list more than one number (e.g., several office numbers, a direct number, a mobile number, and so on) suggest that you have an out-of-date interaction system. Modern phone systems, like Dialpad and Google Voice, can route an incoming call to multiple gadgets.

4. Get rid of e-mail address.

Believe carefully before you put an email address on either your slides or business cards. If you’re in sales and your potential customers choose email, include your address. Often, however, your e-mail address on a card just indicates you’ll be added to an email list.

At this moment, we’ve gotten rid of info that individuals should have the ability to find with a basic search. Next, let’s take a look at some details you may include.

Details to include.

1. Include an image.

Individuals keep in mind faces. Add a recent picture to your company card and slides to remind individuals why they have the card: “Oh, I keep in mind, I saw her give a discussion in Peoria.” A photo can also help people differentiate you from other individuals with the exact same or comparable name.

2. Add your social streams.

I see too numerous slide decks and company cards that fail to list the individual’s social media accounts. Be sure to include your username on slides and company cards but only include streams where you engage regularly and want people to link.

3. Include security.

If you should use email, remember that e-mail messages are inherently insecure. Add a link to your PGP key to let individuals send you encrypted messages.

4. Include ease of access.

Enhance the font size on your slides and business cards as much as possible. Hold your company card at arm’s length and eliminate your glasses. You might also include braille to your cards to make your company card details available to more people.

5. Include a reason to connect.

Add a reason for people to link with you on your business card and in your slides. Other times, you may note your interests or fields of focus.

The start of the story.

Borrow a lesson from the film market for your slides and business cards. Many early films revealed a number of minutes of credits before the story got going. Many contemporary films start with the story: They show us a scene designed to attract our attention.

Your slides and company cards don’t have to note every possible method a person might reach you. Instead, they simply need to invite people to take an action to start the story.

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